Feeling Uninspired? These Are the Best Hairstyles for Fine Hair

hair inso

Having very thin and fine hair can pose a challenge if you like a voluminous updo or thick curls. It can be hard to create volume by yourself, without the help of a professional. But many people with thick hair envy you! There are a ton of hairstyles that are easier to create and that look better on someone with thin hair. We have a list of the best hairstyles for fine hair.

  • The Angled Cut

If you cut thick hair at an angle, especially if you have shorter hair, it tends to blend together in thick waves and it is hard to even see the shape that the hairdresser had in mind. If the hair is curly, the effect is even less visible. However, this is a perfect cut for those with finer hair, as every strand falls into place. An angled bob also creates an illusion of thicker hair, thanks to the different layers and lengths. If you also add some waves using a curling iron or rollers, it will definitely add more body to the look.

Hairstyles for fine hair
Bangs and a Medium length.
  • Bangs and Medium Length

Having bangs with thick hair is kind of a challenge. Most of the time, they do the opposite of what they are supposed to and bend one way or the other. Many people with thick hair also have frizzy hair, which may not be the look you want when cutting bangs. But cutting bangs to a medium length hair, is one of the best hairstyles for fine hair. With thinner hair, the bangs will just fall down and create a relaxed and chill look. This will also make the hair around your face look fuller. You can make tousles in the rest of the hair using saltwater spray, or go the other direction and straighten it to the max. Either way looks good with well-behaved bangs.

  • A Feminine Ponytail

This is another hairstyle that is perfect for those with fine strands. Make the ponytail hight on your head and wrap a strand of hair around the hair tie to hide it. If you curl only the ends of the hair you will make them bouncy and achieve that retro look. If you want to add more volume, start off by using a dry shampoo close to your scalp and tousle your hair.

  • A Very Short Bob

A short bob cut – or if you are really brace, go even shorter an try a pixie – is definitely easier to pull off if you have thin hair. The hair is easier to shape and does not demand a lot of attention to look good. The angles and layers that it takes to cut this kind of hairstyle also makes your hair look fuller.

bob cut
A bob cut.
  • Blow-Dried Curls

The thing with thin and fine hair is that hairstyles – like curly ones – last longer because the hair is not heavy enough to weigh the curls down. Using a curling iron, or – better for your hair health – foam rollers or braids, to create waves will immediately create an illusion of more action. Blow-drying your hair after washing it while using a round brush to make waves will give it volume. Make sure to use a volumizing mousse and finish with a lightweight spray to fix the look.

  • If You Can’t Be Bothered to Style Your Hair

If you lack the time or energy for a lot of styling, be happy that thin hair can look good with minimal effort! Many of the best hairstyles for fine hair do not really demand much.

But – if you suspect that your hair is thin for some other reason than your genetics, looking over your health is a good idea.

Female hair loss is quite common, but most of the time it has an explanation and a solution. Hormonal changes, vitamin deficiencies, stress or pregnancy can all cause hair thinning in women. A healthy diet is important to fight this, as well as enough sleep and a checkup to make sure there is no medical reason. A natural hair supplement could also aid healthy hair growth.

Female Pattern Baldness – An Overview

female baldness

Up to 50 percent of men experience hair loss before hitting 50. Yes, that many, and yes, the issue is that common – as are the treatments. Everything from transplants costing thousands of dollars; to the well known drug Propecia, with its libido-losing side effects; to faithful natural solutions that are long-lasting because they work on making the entire body healthy rather than focusing only on the hair.

The main type of hair loss for both genders is androgenetic alopecia, also known as female pattern hair loss or male pattern hair loss.

Female pattern baldness may not be as common, but for those affected it can be even harder, as a shaved head is sometimes not a desired look among women as it is for men. No matter the reason for the hair loss, the anxiety and stigma that follows with female pattern baldness is stressful for many.

What is Androgenetic Alopecia?

Harvard Medical School wrote this about androgenetic alopecia:
“As the name suggests, androgenetic alopecia involves the action of the hormones called androgens. Which are essential for normal male sexual development and have other important functions in both sexes, including sex drive and regulation of hair growth. The condition may be inherited and involve several different genes. It can also result from an underlying endocrine condition. Such as overproduction of androgen or an androgen-secreting tumor on the ovary, pituitary, or adrenal gland. In either case, the alopecia is likely related to increased androgen activity. But unlike androgenetic alopecia in men, in women the precise role of androgens is harder to determine.”

What Causes Female Pattern Baldness?

The causes are many, including medical conditions, medications, and physical or emotional stress. When the clinicians explain female pattern hair loss, they most commonly use the Ludwig Classification from 1977. The Ludwig Classification divides female pattern hair loss into three categories:

  • Type I is mild, with minimal thinning that can be camouflaged with hair styling techniques.
  • Type II moderate and is characterized by decreased volume and noticeable widening of the mid-line part.
  • Type III is extensive with a see-through appearance (sometimes total baldness) on the top of the scalp.

 

Almost every woman will eventually develop some kind of female pattern hair loss. When it occurs will depend on your DNA. For some it can start as early as puberty, for others during menopause. The risk rises with age, and the risk is higher for women who have a history of hair loss on either side of the family.

What Can You Do?

The most common treatment is through medication – here are some of them:

Anti-androgens
Some anti-angrogens are Aldactone and Propecia, but these androgen receptor-blocking drugs are not really for women to use. There are only a few studies on what affect they have on women, which means little reliable evidence that they are effective or even safe. Therefore these options are really only open to men.

female hair loss
Almost every woman will eventually develop some kind of female pattern baldness. When it will occur, depends on your DNA.

Iron Supplements
When women lose hair, iron deficiency can be one of the causes. Get your clinic to test you and see if you are short on iron. If the iron level is less than 70 nanograms per milliliter, then your doctor may suggest taking an iron supplement.

Botanical Supplements
Going green is always a wise suggestion. Botanical supplements contain many of the nutrients your hair needs. These kind of supplements are usually sourced from herbs and vitamins that go along well. The ingredients target the potential triggers of thinning hair and provide your hair with the essential nutrients it needs to stay healthy.

Brazilian Blowout: What You Need to Know

Nutrafol for healthy hair

If you are someone who keeps up with the newest in hair care, chances are you have heard about the Brazilian Blowout. A Brazilian Blowout treatment is a hair protectant that gives your hair a glossy, frizz-free, hydrated shine for up to three months. The ingredients used when doing a Brazilian Blowout are the Brazilian camu camu, annatto seed, and acai berries, which sound harmless enough. But studies show Brazilian Blowouts can actually pose a real health risk.

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What is a Brazilian Blowout?

Just what is a Brazilian Blowout hair treatment? The treatment is generally recommended for people with damaged, frizzy, or very processed hair. A Brazilian Blowout treatment is meant to make your hair straighter, shinier and frizz-free, which can tempt many of us to try it. But then there’s the question of how long does a Brazilian Blowout last, and it turns out the results only last for about 10-12 weeks. And that is if you maintain it the way the stylists tell you to, which we all know is hard to keep up with.

When you go for your Brazilian Blowout treatment, the stylist will assess your hair and answer any questions you have, from what is a Brazilian Blowout to how to care for your hair following a Brazilian Blowout treatment. The first step of a Brazilian Blowout is to wash the hair and then towel dry it. Next, the smoothing product is applied in sections. After that, the stylist will blow dry your hair while making it as smooth as possible using a brush. After a round of flat ironing, the stylist will rinse the hair out using only water, and then apply a specific bonding spray that will seal the cuticles of the hair. After that, it is time for a smoothing serum before the final blow dry and styling.

Why is a Brazilian Blowout Dangerous?

If you’ve read many Brazilian Blowout reviews, you know a lot of customers are satisfied with the results the smoothing treatment has on their hair. What those Brazilian Blowout reviews usually don’t mention is that Brazilian Blowouts can be dangerous to your health — not because of the process itself, but rather because of some of the chemicals involved in it. While many people want to know “How long does a Brazilian Blowout last,” a better question might be “How long can the potentially harmful effects of a Brazilian Blowout last?”

Did Somebody Say Free From Formaldehyde?

What is in a Brazilian Blowout hair treatment that could be considered harmful? Although the products used in the Brazilian Blowout, and the similar Keratin treatment, are reported as free from the carcinogenic chemical formaldehyde, the air in salons offering these treatments tested positive for formaldehyde. How is this possible?

Some manufacturers list “synonyms” for formaldehyde on their labels. This is because sometimes the formaldehyde has been dissolved in water or another substance, which changes its chemical composition slightly, giving it a new name. The problem is that all these substances can release formaldehyde when subjected to certain conditions, such as the heat involved in a hair smoothing treatment, or even when using heating tools later at home.

For this reason, The American Cancer Society wrote the following about keratin smoothing treatments: “Professional keratin hair-smoothing treatments can contain formaldehyde or formaldehyde-releasing chemicals. Using these can raise indoor air concentrations of formaldehyde to levels that could be a potential hazard.”

All of the chemicals listed below are names for formaldehyde under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s formaldehyde standard:

Methylene glycol
Formalin
Methylene oxide
Paraform
Formic aldehyde
Methanal
Oxomethane
Oxymethylene
Timonacic acid
Thiazolidinecarboxylic acid

Is Getting a Brazilian Blowout Worth the Risk?

Formaldehyde is known to cause cancer and tends to be the worst when it is in the gaseous heated stage. It is a “sensitizer,” which means that it can cause allergic reactions of the skin, eyes, and lungs such as asthma-like breathing, skin rashes, and itching. It can also be a health hazard, whether in a product or in the air.

Studies conducted by The American Cancer Society have shown that formaldehyde can increase the probability of nasopharynx cancer and leukemia. One study found that workers exposed to formaldehyde had higher than normal levels of chromosome changes in early white blood cells in their bone marrow. This finding supports the possible link between formaldehyde exposure and leukemia.

Other Everyday Chemicals You Should Get Rid Of

Considering this, maybe it is not worth risking your and your stylist’s health for the sake of beauty. There are other, safer methods of achieving great hair without turning to Brazilian Blowouts. Have you, for example, considered natural solutions and skipping the chemicals for a while? We are not only talking about choosing a supplement made from plants to increase your hair health, we are talking about changing your routines, even when it comes to how you wash your hair. Did you know sulfates, which can be found in many shampoos, are well-known irritants of the skin, eyes, mouth and even lungs? Maybe it is time to take a closer look at the ingredients of that bottle you use every other day.

The study “Exposure to Chemicals in Cosmetics” conducted by the Breast Cancer Foundation shed some new light on another shampoo ingredient — parabens — and what effect it has on the body. The study discovered that parabens can penetrate the skin and act as a very weak form of estrogen in the body potentially making hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer develop and grow.

So how about getting rid of shampoos containing sulfates and parabens and switching to a sulfate-free shampoo? Sulfate-free shampoos preserve your hair’s natural oils and are also color-safe, which is good if you dye your hair a lot. Instead of buying hair masks, which also have chemicals in them, you can make your own. A hair mask made from avocado, for example, contains vitamin E and is easy to make. Vitamin E is good for hair growth because it is a great moisturizer and also boosts the immune system.

Hair Loss and Cancer – Chemotherapy Does Not Need to Lead to Hair Loss Anymore

Hair Loss and cancer – as if the dreaded disease isn’t bad enough it usually comes with the added burden of hair loss. So when the news hit the world of a new device that helps cancer patients keep their hair during chemotherapy, cancer patients everywhere felt there might be a small amount of relief to everything they already have to deal with.

DigniCap is the name of the device that is supposed to revolutionize hair loss during chemotherapy. It is a scalp cooling system that offers patients the possibility of keeping all or most of their hair during chemotherapy. According to DigniCap, the cooling system was approved by the FDA for use in the U.S. in December 2015.

Modern medicine has come a long way when it comes to handling the side effects of chemotherapy, making many aspects of the treatment manageable for the patients. But hair loss has been one of the side effects that for a long time was unavoidable. Many patients going through chemotherapy has said that they do not like the fact that hair loss makes it so obvious to others that they are are sick.

Dr. Saranya Chumsri, an oncologist specializing in breast cancer at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, a clinic that now offers their patients DigniCap, said in an interview for the local paper that many patients do not want to be reminded they have cancer.

“Even though they, most of the time, feel really well, the fact that they don’t have hair reminds them every single day that they have cancer and are on chemotherapy. With the DigniCap system, just the fact they can keep their hair makes a whole world of difference,” said Dr Chumsri.

 

How Dignicap Works When Dealing with Cancer and Hair Loss

The DigniCap scalp cooling system is a tight-fitting silicone cooling cap. The cap is placed directly on the head of the person. And an outer cap is placed on the first silicone cap, and insulates and secures it.

The cap is connected to a cooler, where liquid coolant circulates throughout the silicone cap, delivering cooling to all areas of the scalp. Before the patients put on the cap, they wet their hair, and sometimes, when the treatment is done, they can actually find ice crystals in their hair. The temperature of the scalp is lowered and the scalp is kept cold, and because of that, less chemotherapy makes it to the scalp.

These are the factors that reduce the risk of hair loss. What determines how long the patients will be attached to the DigniCap, is the treatment that they are getting. But it usually last from four to seven hours.

Dignicap and hair loss
More and more clinics are integrating Dignicap as part of the post-cancer treatment.

Still Unattainable for Most People

Even though DigniCap is revolutionizing the battle of cancer and hair loss, it is still a tool that is mainly for those who can afford it. Using DigniCap is not cheap. In fact, it costs about $400 for each treatment.

Other problems that have been reported are that some of the patients get a headache from the cap, and that the strap on the cap can give some patients irritations on the chin. Nonetheless, more and more clinics are integrating DigniCap as part of their post-cancer treatment, making it a great development when it comes to cancer and hair loss.

William Cronin, the Chief Executive Officer of Dignitana Inc, the company that produces DigniCap, says in an article that he is honored to make a real difference for cancer patients who fear losing their hair to chemotherapy.

“As more and more centers like the Mayo Clinic integrate new innovations like the DigniCap system into their cancer care regimens, we move closer and closer to the day when that fear is a thing of the past,” he comments.

 

New Research Shows How Stem Cells Can be Used Against Hair Loss

New Research on stem cells and hair loss.

Hair loss is a major issue for a lot of people. It can have a profound impact on our mental well being and our mental health directly affects our physical health. Millions of men and women suffer from hair loss in the US, and there is still no foolproof way to combat it. Hair supplements, a changed diet, hair transplantation or topical medications are a few methods, but new research from the UCLA shows that stem cells may hold an important answer to the problem.

What Are Stem Cells?

Stem cells are different from other cells since they can develop into different kinds of cells in the body. They work as a part of the body’s repair system, by assisting where they are needed. After a stem cell divides, the new cells can either turn into other stem cells, or into a certain type of cell – a blood cell or a brain cell for example. Thanks to this ability, they offer a unique potential for developing treatments against different diseases.

How Hair Loss Works

To understand hair loss, you have to understand the hair growth cycle. This cycle consists of four stages: the anagen, catagen, telogen and exogen. They correspond to the growing phase; the transitional phase when the growing stops; the resting phase when the hair follicle is dormant; and the shedding phase in which dead hair will fall out.

The phases are not the same for everyone. If you have a shorter growing phase and a longer shedding phase, naturally you will experience hair thinning. However, there are natural ways to stimulate your hair growthsuch as a scalp massage, hair masks, a more varied diet and natural supplements.

Can Stem Cells be Used Against Hair Loss?
New Research Shows How Stem Cells Can be Used Against Hair Loss

What the New Study Says

The study was published in Nature Cell Biology in August of 2017It specifically looked into the relationship between stem cells and hair growth. Hair follicle stem cells, HFSC, are cells inside our hair follicles. Normally, these are dormant, but when the hair reaches its growth phase, the anagen phase, they wake up and start producing new hair. That is, if they work as they should. If something interrupts the hair growth cycle, the hair follicle will produce less hair than what is shed during the same period.

Here comes the interesting part – the metabolic process of the HFSC’s turn glucose in the body into something called puryvate. This is a kind of acid that is also available as a supplement, as it is believed to contributing to weight loss and fighting high cholesterol. The body will either send this compound to the mitochondria of the stem cell, where it harvests energy – or it will convert it into yet another compound – lactate. The group of researchers behind he study were trying to see if they could decrease the amount of puryvate that went to the mitochondria, and instead increase the amount that turned into lactate. The theory was that lactate would boost hair growth.

The team performed the tests on mice, by altering their genetics. In the mice whose cells were altered to not produce any lactate, the HFSC remained dormant and did not produce any hair. In the mice whose cells produced more lactate than normal levels, the HFSC increased in activity and produced more hair. Patents for drugs that will cause stem cells to increase the production of lactate have been filed, however, the drugs have not yet been been tested on humans.

When it comes to healthy hair growth we recommend going for a natural solution that provides your hair with all the essential nutrients it needs.