Onion Juice for Hair Growth: Does It Work?

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Onion juice has gotten some hype lately on social media. The claim is that you can use onion juice for hair growth. But does onion for hair growth really work? Instead of wading through different websites about onion juice for hair loss, we did the research for you to find out if onion juice for hair loss really works.

Get Hair, Health & Science News

Scientific Study Investigates Whether Onion Juice for Hair Growth Works

There’sone study published regarding onion juice for hair regrowth, “Onion juice (Allium cepa L.), a new topical treatment for alopecia areata,” which researched the effects of using onion juice or onion oil for hair growth.

In this study, patients with alopecia areata — a form of sudden hair loss in which one or more circular bald patches may overlap on the scalp — were divided into two groups. Group 1 was directed to apply onion juice to the scalp twice a day for two months, and Group 2 was advised to apply tap water to the scalp twice a day for two months.

After two weeks of treatment, notable effects were already taking place to demonstrate the efficacy of onion for hair growth. Regrowth of coarse hairs was observed in Group 1, and after four weeks, researchers observed regrowth in 86.9% of the group that was using onions for hair growth.

The researchers concluded that onion juice can be an effective therapy for patchy alopecia areata and to promote hair regrowth. In other words, onion juice for hair regrowth can be helpful.

Why is Onion Juice Effective Against Hair Loss?

Onion juice may seem to be an unlikely treatment to fight against hair loss, but these veggies actually have many natural benefits for hair. Onions are rich in sulfur, which has antibacterial and antifungal properties, so it’s effective at killing germs and parasites as well as helping heal fungal infections. Hair loss is often triggered by an unhealthy scalp, so it makes sense that sulfur-rich onion juice may be helpful for some causes of hair loss. Another benefit when applying it to the scalp is that onion juice helps to get rid of dandruff, which is usually fungal in nature. Onions also contain quercetin, an antioxidant that studies have shown may be useful in treating alopecia areata.

How to Use Onion Juice on Your Hair

Want to try onion juice to see whether it helps your hair? Here’s how to get onion juice.

  1. Grate an onion and strain the pulp. You can strain it with a sieve, press it between two spoons, or squeeze it through cheesecloth. Throw away the pulp and use only the juice.
  2. Use a juicer. This is the easiest method and will give you the greatest amount of onion juice for you to work with.

Are there any onion juice for hair growth side effects? Possibly. After using onion juice, some people noticed their scalp has become red and itchy. This is why it’s important to test how you react to onion juice by applying it to a very small area before putting it all over your scalp. Onion juice is very strong, so avoid any broken skin or sore areas. If you’re still concerned about getting a reaction like this, try boiling chopped onions and using the water once it has cooled down, which is much milder than pure onion juice.

How About the Smell?

Onions do have a very strong smell but the smell is only intense during application. When the onion juice has been washed out, the smell is barely noticeable. But if the odor still lingers, there are a few things you can try to remove it:

How to Get the Most Out of Your Onion Juice Treatment

Massage onion juice into the scalp and leave it overnight if possible. If not, 30 minutes will do. Apply it as often as you can, like whenever you’re getting ready to wash your hair. It can take a few weeks before you see any results. You can also complement the treatment with some natural supplements like Nutrafol that don’t smell to support healthy hair growth. Combining the two treatments will ensure your hair is happy and healthy.

Photos: Mitch Huang via Flickr
Aurelien Guichard via Flickr

MEDICALLY REVIEWED BY
DR. KATELYN CLOYD, ND

on July 15, 2017

Get Hair, Health & Science News